Common IRS Audit Flags


June 27, 2017 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Online Auction


 If you look after your teeth and steer clear of certain factors, you will be able to avoid a root canal. Similarly, if you look after your financial health and avoid certain practices, you may be able to avoid an IRS audit. There are many red flags that show that you may have an IRS problem, and they may have to audit you.

An IRS audit is a fair review of your tax returns to determine their accuracy. You’re burdened with proving particular deductions.

Remember these IRS audit flags:

One flag for IRS auditors is claiming too much donations to charity. If the standard charitable donation is $ 500 and you declare $ 2000, this puts you out of the average, which encourages the possibility that you’ll be flagged for an audit. You must be able to prove the full amount by keeping your receipts.
Those who are self-employed may be flagged for too many deductions. The IRS is very cautious to watch out for these kinds of deductions.
You will be carefully examined if you make over $ 100,000.
Inconsistencies between this year’s return and last year’s. These can be as simple as a name change because of marriage, but inconsistencies do stand out and are going to be noticed.
Drastic changes in income. For example, the IRS will target you for an audit if you just made $ 20,000 this year when you earned $ 20,000 last year. Indeed, there are a lot of reasons why your income could have changed so much. You should be able to prove it.
Incomplete tax returns are a flag for the IRS, too. You’re prone to be audited if your returns have incomplete or illegible answers.
Inconsistencies between state and federal returns.

 

You should fly under the radar and truthfully report deductions to steer clear of an IRS audit. For at least three years, you must keep documentation. If you see yourself among the 1.66 million Americans who are being audited, how can you survive with less stress and damage? To stop this small IRS issue from becoming a catastrophe, take a look at the following tips:

 

Know that you can pay in installments, conduct the audit by mail without meeting the IRS, refute its accuracy, and other rights.
By keeping documentation, you are ready to present receipts.
If the problem is too complicated for you, a professional should be consulted.
You have nothing to fear if it’s an honest mistake.
Unnecessary information should not be provided.
Don’t panic because accuracy is merely reviewed and you are not being accused of anything.

 

Your IRS problem should not be a nightmare. If you cannot avoid audits, stay calm if you are selected for one. An attorney can assist you.

 

 

Darrin T. Mish is a Nationally recognized Attorney whose practice focuses on representing clients across the United States with IRS Problems. He is AV rated by Martindale-Hubbel and is a member of the American Society of IRS Problem Solvers and the Tax Freedom Institute. He has been honored by a listing in Martindale-Hubbel’s Bar Register of Preeminent Lawyers. His passion is providing IRS help to taxpayers with both individual and payroll tax problems. He teaches attorneys, CPAs and Enrolled Agents in the finer aspects of IRS representation all around the United States. He can be reached at his website at http://www.getIRShelp.com

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